Road studs

especially for horse owners to ask advice, from farriers or from other owners, all welcome, also please post details of lost or stolen horses here
Rachael B

Road studs

Postby Rachael B » Thu Mar 10, 2005 9:47 pm

My mare who is 19 slips a lot on the roads. They are very slippy where we are in Cornwall. She slips so much that I have to get off and walk with her but my friend carries on riding her horse who is a similar age and is shod by a different farrier. My farrier puts round road studs into the shoes( not stud nails) by hitting them very hard with a hammer on the point of the anvil. A couple of days after shoeing the studs are flat and the little tip is non existant. I know that this is a forum for farriers and you are unlikely to criticise yourselves, but I dont understand why my mares studs are flat straight away and my friends horses studs stay prominant for weeks. My friend says that her farrier does not bash hell out of the studs.Please could you suggest what I could say to my farrier without offending him!

Guest

Postby Guest » Fri Mar 11, 2005 6:59 pm

Get your friends farrier to shoe it!

Rachael B

Road Studs

Postby Rachael B » Fri Mar 11, 2005 7:20 pm

Thanks, I might do that, but I have been using my farrier for over 3 years now and feel a certain loyalty to him.Having said that, my horses welfare comes first. How would you farriers like to be told that an owner wanted to change, without causing you offence!

admin
Site Admin
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Postby admin » Fri Mar 11, 2005 9:48 pm

Hi Rachel,

Just tell your farrier that your mare is slipping and ask what he can do. It is no big deal, we all have a first approach to prevention of slipping that works most of the time, but sometimes horses need extra grip, but we don't know if you don't tell us!

Jenny Mac

Postby Jenny Mac » Sat Mar 12, 2005 2:52 pm

Rachel - the roads are very slippery at the moment and some of the new road surfaces are known to be even worse (see recent articles in H & H). I however don't think that studs / road nails or any artificial 'aid' is the answer to your problem. If your horse is balanced and concentrating on its job it should be able to shorten or lengthen according to the surface. I suspect that you are hesitant with your horse when you think the road is slippery and your horse is not positive in its stride. I also happen to feel that the introduction of studs or pins is potentially damaging to a horse. Just imagine the stress caused by the constant jarring. The use of studs on wet/mudy surfaces is slightly different but in that instance we are talking about performance not everyday exercise. Hope this gives you some food for thought.

Rachael B

Road Studs

Postby Rachael B » Sat Mar 12, 2005 9:18 pm

Thanks for your reply Jenny Mac. Yes it is food for thought, however we are dealing here with a 19 year old who is a bit arthritic and has lost her confidence walking on the roads. She is fine on the tracks and in the school and trots and canters very well as she is well schooled and responsive. She also slips as I said when walking inhand, on the roads,so I am not sure that has anything to do with my confidence or her striding out-but I agree if it was happening when being ridden it could have been. She slips often -the roads are worn -(rather than the new surface as reported on in H&H) ,and I can feel her stride shortening because of that.I have owned her for 14 years, so I know her.She virtually skis down the very steep hill.
Anyway I have decided that I have mentioned slipping enough times to my farrier over the past 18months, and there has been no improvement, and no new methods tried,and it is time to try someone else. I have tried all sorts of things-someone else riding my horse-very confident rider-she slips.I have tried riding behind another faster horse-she slips.I could go on.Yesterday I was given an opinion by a chiro who is a qualified farrier who said that she has been shod with no heel support, her toes are too long behind (shod 10 days ago)the studs are non existant and her shoes are far too narrow.I will post when she has been reshod. Thanks again.

Jenny Mac

Postby Jenny Mac » Sun Mar 13, 2005 9:47 am

Rachel - It seems such a shame that your farrier won't try something else - but you are doing your best for your horse and that is what's important. I drive my horse and find that if he's a bit 'new' he is inclined to slip but if I let him have the weight of the vehicle down a hill he soon pulls himself together and shortens up. He has never had pins, studs or road nails and is shod with a fair amount of weight and plain stamped shoes so he has learned to be careful. Of course if we were carrying passengers or I was using a heavy vehicle I may think again - you can only do what works for you and having studied the way my horse moves (as you have with yours) I know that to jar a free striding horse such as him would probably do a lot of damage. Interestingly though, many years ago when I used to do a bit of show jumping, I never used studs on any of my horses and never really had any problem. Best of luck anyway and let us know how you do.

john ford
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Location: Pucklechurch, Bristol.

Postby john ford » Sun Mar 13, 2005 3:52 pm

Rachael, I have been watching the comments on this subject for some time with interest. And many of the comments I will agree with, yet your horse is still slipping? The two things that I can come up with that haven't been asked are: Is your horse shod with Fullered Concave Shoes, or Three Quarter Fullered, and do you have a Stud fitted on the inside as well as the outside of the shoes ? Concave does grip far better on our roads over here, and having two studs equally placed on the inside and outside branch of the shoe, makes for even braking without twisting the foot or the joints.

Rachael B

Road Studs

Postby Rachael B » Sun Mar 13, 2005 4:42 pm

Thanks again for your comments. I very much appreciate your input.At present she is shod with concave fullered shoes made by the farrier himself in his forge, with 2 studs per shoe. We moved to a new yard a month ago and the horses there are mainly shod by one farrier.Their shoes are different to my horses.My mares hind shoes sit at least one to one and half inches forward of the heel with the toe clip rolled over so that you can see it when the foot is on the ground.When you look at the side of her hind/front feet you cant see the metal of the shoe. The other horses on the yard-you can see the metal of the shoe from the side and the shoes are much wider, both in terms of the actual width of the shoe itself, and the width of the foot -hope I am making sense here! The shoes are machine made, three quarter fullered, because they have a number stamped on??? Also ,without exception, the open part of the shoe is placed much further back , under the heels, with shorter toes. I am like the phantom foot examiner!!! After about 3 weeks my horses feet have usually overgrown the sides of the shoes.They are shod 5 weekly , but occasionally 6. I am puzzled because I just cant accept that my 2 horses are going to be the only ones from the yard that constantly slip on the roads-there must be a common denominator.One is a Welsh cob with great bloodlines, going back to winning the Royal Welsh,who surely should be able to walk along the road without slipping and sliding?

Guest

Postby Guest » Sun Mar 13, 2005 5:46 pm

Rachel b my mare used to slip on the road and was shoed like you say. I couldent get any farrers to stop it until i got CYTEK then she was good. They have grip in the toe and heel and are natrual for the horse. Why dont you try them? And now she goes 10 weeks.

john ford
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Postby john ford » Sun Mar 13, 2005 6:48 pm

Rachael, disregard that last message from the Cytek view, this has nothing to do with a brand or make, more to do with selection of web, size, and fitting. full support of the foot and upper limb would be my first choice. In short, a shoe that fits the conformation above. If the shoes don't wear out, this way you should get 6 to eight weeks with normal riding.

Rachael B

Road Studs

Postby Rachael B » Mon Mar 14, 2005 8:06 pm

Great news!! I asked the new yard farrier to shoe my mare today when he came to the yard. He put wider shoes, three quarter fullered with tungsten tipped round studs-2 in each shoe. He also trimmed her hind feet shorter in the toe.The shoes are definately bigger and set further back, more underneath her heels.It was remarkable-as she walked away from being shod she walked differently, more like when she was younger, lifting her hind feet higher,with her legs a bit further apart- rather than a stiff inward walk, knocking her fetlocks. I took her out for a gentle ride. She did not slip once!!!! I am thrilled.She came down the very steep hill where I always get off and walk, more confidently, and no slipping.I cannot believe that we went out and she did not slip once. The new farrier said that she was probably having trouble with slipping because her toes were too long with insufficient heel support, so she was almost leaning backwards on hind limbs, also the tungsten tips on the studs had been broken or knocked inwards so were" useless". That she would probably benefit from more heel support especially as she is a bit arthritic. The only challenge I have now is to explain to my old farrier why I no longer want him to shoe my horses.I want to be truthful but not offend him as he is a nice man, as was probably doing all he could within his capabilities.

john ford
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Location: Pucklechurch, Bristol.

Postby john ford » Tue Mar 15, 2005 9:10 pm

Very pleased to hear your good fortune Rachael. As I said before, it's not the make of shoe, it is how a foot is trimmed, and how the shoe is fitted that is the difference between a sound and lame horse in many cases.

Racheal b

Road Studs

Postby Racheal b » Wed Mar 16, 2005 12:21 pm

Thanks again John for your input.

Jenny Mac

Postby Jenny Mac » Fri Mar 18, 2005 3:23 pm

I'm pleased to hear your news - your horse seems to have responded well and got her confidence back. Hope she continues to go well for you.
Jenny

Guest

Postby Guest » Fri Mar 18, 2005 5:31 pm

Well then everyones happyexcept the poor old bugger who couldn't sort out the problem in the first place....just how hard can it be to stop a horse from sliding about like BAMBI ?

Jenny Mac

Postby Jenny Mac » Sat Mar 19, 2005 10:15 am

'Guest' - what is it with you cribbing know alls who are to scared to put their names to postings. If you're a farrier then put your money where your mouth is like John Ford et al, but then you run the risk of someone pointing out that you are less than perfect, don't you? Rachel has done the best she can as far as her horse is concerned and seemingly will try to be as tactful as possible to her previous farrier - what's wrong with that? Or do some of you expect god-like status?

john ford
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Postby john ford » Sat Mar 19, 2005 11:55 am

To all those farriers who beleive they are better or more superior than another, just think on. Where and how much of your knowledge came from others, and I bet 90% of it was for free. Manure is only any good once it has been spread about, such is the complex nature of this wonderful trade of farriery. I attended a seminar in Exeter yesterday and came away a much wiser person. This after 35 years in the job.

reply to Jenny Mac

Postby reply to Jenny Mac » Sat Mar 19, 2005 6:31 pm

I am not a farrier JENNY MAC but I employ the services of one who brazes tungsten particles onto my driving cobs shoes. These he obtains by breaking up the cutting tools from metalworking lathes. So there you are Mr Ford another bit of free info that no doubt makes you and any other farrier using this forum 'wiser' and as no one suggested this method I assume no one else is doing it! But hang on a minute I bet we now get posts saying 'Oh but we do!' funny old world this farriery innit!!!

malcolm tribe
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Postby malcolm tribe » Sat Mar 19, 2005 7:10 pm

thanks john nice to see you again perhaps one of these seminars should be for the horse owning public what do you think :lol:

slowhand
Posts: 302
Joined: Sun May 16, 2004 6:28 pm

Postby slowhand » Sun Mar 20, 2005 9:56 am

Anonymous wrote:Well then everyones happyexcept the poor old bugger who couldn't sort out the problem in the first place....just how hard can it be to stop a horse from sliding about like BAMBI ?
A simple question that did not offend me as a farrier because it is not hard at all its very easy. So what caused the vitriolic response from both Jenny Mac and Fordie?. This 'have a pop at farriers' attitude shown by many of the horseowners and some farriers who post on this site stinks so go on both of you why did you respond that post the way you did?

Jenny Mac

Postby Jenny Mac » Sun Mar 20, 2005 3:50 pm

This 'have a pop at farriers' attitude shown by many of the horseowners and some farriers who post on this site stinks so go on both of you why did you respond that post the way you did

I think you must read more carefully whoever you are. I was actually being supportive of the horse owner, the farrier and John Ford. What I was saying is that it is always those who whinge and grizzle who keep their identity secret. There was nothing vitriolic about my reply - I'm happy to use my name - why don't you grow out of your anonimity - or might it be that you'll be found out for what you are?

Guest

Postby Guest » Sun Mar 20, 2005 8:23 pm

VITRIOLIC......CAUSTIC OR HOSTILE
I think SLOWHAND has described your posting accurately there is also a hint of it in your reply to him. I have looked at your post with an open mind and conclude your reply is also ACERBIC, ACIDIC,AGGRESSIVE and ALOADACRAP

farriers wife

Postby farriers wife » Mon Mar 21, 2005 7:58 am

As a farriers wife I must agree with slowhands post about jenny macs posting. Just read it 'more carefully' she says in her reply , well I did and slowhands right. It has a nasty tone to it and what does it matter about anonimity I like to imagine what slowhand looks like because lets face it thats some handle.

JennyMac

Postby JennyMac » Mon Mar 21, 2005 1:49 pm

Oh dear, you do all take it so personally. I stand by what I say though, it is funny how all the smart remarks come from the anonymous - even if they have a secondhand alias....... However, it's great to know how to push buttons.

The Magnificent Seven

Postby The Magnificent Seven » Mon Mar 21, 2005 1:51 pm

JENNY MAC your postings were without doubt VITRIOLICin the true sense of the word I think you must be sitting at home wondering who you can have a go at next. We are a bunch of farriers in NEWMARKET sitting in the local internet cafe and we could not ignore your posts aimed at that guy SLOWHAND . What difference does it make if he wants to be 'secret squirrel' and by the way whats this' plain stamped shoe' all about anyway.

A REAL FARRIER

Postby A REAL FARRIER » Mon Mar 21, 2005 1:52 pm

THERE ARE NO FARRIERS IN NEWMARKET JUST A BUNCH OF PLATERS

Rachael B

Road Studs

Postby Rachael B » Mon Mar 21, 2005 3:53 pm

Whoa fellas,
I am the original poster here and wouldn't want you to fall over my post!!As I have said before I am a caring owner of 2 old horses and just want what is best for my animals.I talked with my original farrier this week, who I like very much, I felt very awkward and didn't want to upset him.He was very professional, but somewhat downhearted about it all. He said that he was always willing to learn and had a look at my friends horse who had also been shod in wider and longer shoes. He said that he never shoes like that as horses that are shod like that often cut into themselves.However, having said that, a year ago she asked him to liaise with the vet about shoeing her horse differently due to its sacro-iliac problem, and he refused.Co- incidence that we have ended up on the same yard. Hence why I decided to grab my opportunity to have my horse shod by the yard farrier.
Now that you are here please could I ask another question-if I dare. You know the round road studs that are rivetted -? spelling-into the shoe do they work please as follows:
1) Tungsten tip within the round stud is driven in hard, so that the round part works first and acts as a sort of stud until it is worn and then the tungsten tip is exposed.
2) Tungsten tip is left proud and works until worn away and then the round bit acts.
Also I didn't read anything derogatory into Jenny Macs replies??? I thought that she was being supportive of my dilemma -so thanks to her also to John. Wish I could meet the Magnificent Seven-scary!!!!!!!!
Seriously,many thanks everyone from a humble horse owner- anytime you would like to run a course for us thick but skint and those that pay your wages horseowners , Malcolm do let me know, I would love to met you-Love you all!!!

Jenny Mac

Postby Jenny Mac » Mon Mar 21, 2005 4:43 pm

I can't agree that there are only platers in Newmarket - I believe there are more than few noteworthy 'fellows' (AWs DipWs as well) in East Anglia. However if they can afford to be sitting in an internet cafe on a sunny Monday the money in that area must be too good - but I guess you racing farriers must start work very early early so maybe not.
Rachel understood me and I had only tried to offer some help and support to her as another horse owner - is it that you don't like us having opinions or is it just that you don't like us having a discussion without criticism or sarcasm. If you read the entire thread you will see that until Anon posted his sarcastic comments on 18 March, the discussion had been adult, constructive and completely focused on Rachel's dilema. I think maybe if I posted 'anon' it might not raise as many hackles. But I won't do that.

Guest

Postby Guest » Mon Mar 21, 2005 5:10 pm

Rachael, the tungsten tip in all studs, whether it be a nail, or a drive in plug etc. is the bit that stops you slipping. Nails are just made from mild steel, with the tungsten tip inserted. The drive-in stud is just a larger round peace of mild steel with a larger tungsten tip inserted. So when the tungsten tip has gone, so has your grip. I hope this explains your question.

Guest

Postby Guest » Mon Mar 21, 2005 5:12 pm

Ive just had my computer man serviceing my machine, seems he has wiped out my cookies. Last message was from John Ford NOT GUEST

slowhand
Posts: 302
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Postby slowhand » Mon Mar 21, 2005 7:02 pm

Things are getting a bit heated ladies and thank you 'farriers wife' SLOWHANDdescribes me to a T[. A bit of BARRY WHITE a glass or two of the finest wine, bend you over the anvil and [b]WALLOPa perfect night out

Guest

One of the MAGNIFICENT SEVEN

Postby Guest » Tue Mar 22, 2005 7:01 pm

RACHAEL B
You sound like my kind of woman

Proud to Plate

Postby Proud to Plate » Tue Mar 22, 2005 7:04 pm

[quote="A REAL FARRIER"][b]THERE ARE NO FARRIERS IN NEWMARKET JUST A BUNCH OF PLATERS[/b][/quote]

I wonder if " a Real Farrier" can tell me what his definition of a real farrier is and why he has such a derogatory view of those of us who shoe racehorses? Do other farriers agree with him?

Rachael B

For One of the Magnificent Seven (Road )studs

Postby Rachael B » Tue Mar 22, 2005 10:16 pm

Well-what can I say-you have made my day!!!

Rachael B

Road Studs

Postby Rachael B » Tue Mar 22, 2005 10:27 pm

Thanks Guest for your reply about tungsten tips.No tip- no grip!
My original farrier gave that explanation as to why he bashes in the tungsten tips.He said that the round steel part provides the grip until it wears down on the road. When it is worn the tungsten tip then protrudes and provides grip until the next shoeing. I think, in hindsight, that you are right Malcolm, we horseowners need a course to tell the bullsh*t from the horsesh*t. Sorry must be the 2 glasses of wine.

Chrissie

Postby Chrissie » Wed Mar 23, 2005 2:50 pm

Proud to Plate wrote:
A REAL FARRIER wrote:THERE ARE NO FARRIERS IN NEWMARKET JUST A BUNCH OF PLATERS


I wonder if " a Real Farrier" can tell me what his definition of a real farrier is and why he has such a derogatory view of those of us who shoe racehorses? Do other farriers agree with him?
I saw this ref to PLATERS and was puzzled as I had never heard the term so I asked my farrier if he new what it meant. He said that for example if a farrier shoes exclusively in a racing yard then he will use light steel and alluminium shoes off the peg so to speak due to not having time to make any as he will be too busy. He also said that racehorses are shod more often and are done much quicker. He also said that there is another term used in farriery called Newmarket Foot which describes the long toe low heel syndrome. It is common sense that if a racing farrier shoes nothing other than racehorses, only uses machined shoes and spends a number of years doing the same work then he is correctly referred to as a PLATER whereas a farrier who shoes racehorces as a small part of his work would not be a PLATER. This is not meant to be demeaning just stating the obvious

Proud to Plate

Postby Proud to Plate » Wed Mar 23, 2005 4:42 pm

Thanks Chrisie, I'm sure you and your farrier would not use it as an insult and since I'm Proud to Plate I obviously don't. What I'm interested in is the implication by the "real farrier" it is an insult. He might like to consider that all farriers cover the same syllabus and no one taking their Diploma ever had to shoe a racehorse. So the majority of platters have succeeded in the "real farriers" world. Could he suceed in theirs? The other interesting thing is that the most useful work on long toe low heel syndrome was done in Newmarket. Not on racehorses of course. Finally Jenny Mac quite rightly refers to the number of recognised farriers from Newmarket. Ron Ware, Mark Rose, Simon Curtis to name just 3. Just in case you wonder, I'm not from Newmarket but I know who I take my hat off to.

Get that chip off your shoulder real farrier!

Corky Mc

Postby Corky Mc » Wed Mar 23, 2005 5:58 pm

I am a farrier of many years standing and have shod more racehorses than I care to remember having worked for two large yards. The term Newmarket Foot came about many years ago because very few racehorses were shod with any thought to balance. Most were shod in a hurry due to a lack of time and over a period the toe was allowed to become too long and the heels collapsed and were severely under-run. I saw this regularly on horses that arrived from yards that had a 'name' in the racing world. Believe me in over 20 years the number of properly shod racehorses I saw you could count on the fingers of 2 hands.

Guest

Postby Guest » Wed Mar 23, 2005 6:15 pm

Evenin'
Thought I 'd have a look before tea and must agree with Corky Mc the worst shoeing I ever saw was during my time in racing. If a farrier spends his working life nailing readymade plates cold , say 25 years, and another man spends 25 years shoeing a variety of horses which one is the farrier? The platers are going to say both but I bet the others wont. As long as there have been farriers the racing boys have been known as 'just a plater'

Guest

Re: For One of the Magnificent Seven (Road )studs

Postby Guest » Wed Mar 23, 2005 6:43 pm

Rachael B wrote:Well-what can I say-you have made my day!!!
Thanks Rachael but I'd rather make your NIGHT

P N B

Postby P N B » Wed Mar 23, 2005 8:56 pm

Corky / Guest,

It seems you are making an assumption that all Under Run heels / Run Forwards solar plates are a result of neglectfull farrier practice, Is this correct??

Before you answer if only it was that simple. I suggest you obtain some race and head on video footage and watch the way racehorses actually gallop, the ajustment to thier strides they adapt to / adopt for many reasons. Relate this data to conformation / injury / and hoof capsular shape both congenital and aquired, then come back on line with a set of more informed observations / conclusions regarding us much maligned platers and our clients. Historically we find our selves long downtrodden by the great and the good some of who have never shod any other race horse than a few pointers and the occasional worn out veteran.

That way you may begin to see some light as it very dark where your heads are presently located. One never knows something constructive maybe well come about due to your efforts.

Chips ours are wrapped in yesterdays racing post and come with a large portion of fish, and are simply just not worn on a shoulder.

PNB.

Guest

Postby Guest » Thu Mar 24, 2005 7:11 pm

PNB
Dress it up in how you like but the bottom line is ...it aint rocket science... are you saying that there are no platers just banging a shoe on regardless cos I,ve been in headquarters and seen for myself what passes for farriery. Too many blokes undercutting each other...too many blokes not getting paid and wasnt there some concern at Hereford cos racing ATFs couldnt give apprentices enough variety. How does an apprentice to a racing farrier get experience of proper shoeing if all he sees is thoroughbreds with a 51/2 inch foot

P N B

Postby P N B » Thu Mar 24, 2005 9:30 pm

Guest,

Rocket science horse shoeing is not. The basic's of the job on the foot need to be correct, there is little difference between the basics of plating, the shoeing of shetlands or shires, save the size and the weight of metal. The clinical conditions are all there in race horses and manifest themselves just as often as in the happy hacker or the vanner!!

Platers use shoes from the bag, I hear you say, OK I was at a training farriers conference last year with 50 others, the quesion was put, " Today nobody actually uses hand made shoes"?? 9 men of the 50 screamed that they did 18%, coincidentally most of them were known and were synonomous as being long standing competition farriers. It is very comendable to keep the ancient skill of forging horse shoes by hand alive, it is a comfortable situation to have year on year the world champion horse shoer coming from our small islands. Forging shoes from bar by hand however it is a non productive excersise when steel from the bar added with the fuel needed equals the cost of buying ready made horse shoes. Even if the shoes produced were better and consistently made to meet and improve to the needs of the horse. This is hard to see, apprentices starting of their training, those are the ones that live in the forge day on day producing shoe after shoe. I ask you do those apprentices produced shoes that compare favourably with computer designed and produced ready mades, are they EQUAL IN QUALITY?? it is hard to see, and as a viability excersise can it possibly be cost effective practice??

PNB.

Guest

Postby Guest » Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:20 pm

PNB
Ok then 41 out of 50 didnt make shoes. Most ATFs use their apprentices as shoemaking machines i.e everything thats made goes on regardless. I'

Guest

Postby Guest » Sat Mar 26, 2005 6:41 pm

82% dont make shoes. Just what point are you trying to make Peter. In any poll if 82% dont agree then its a massive magority. 18% of farriers make shoes then 18% have got too much time on their hands I dont have time to arse about in the forge bending iron I need to be out making a living. If this means battering on readymades at £500.00 a day then so be it!! Oh for the days when a set of shoes costs a hundred pounds.......... It will happen one day!

PNB
Posts: 2238
Joined: Sun Jun 23, 2002 6:59 am
Location: Wilts, Berks, Ox, Hants, Avon.

Point

Postby PNB » Sat Mar 26, 2005 7:57 pm

Guest,

I am not trying to make points, simply don't decry us platers just because we fit ready made shoes cold. We meet the requirements of our four and two legged clients, applying basic principle, with the method demanded, then still have time for a smile.

We start work at the crack of dawn and finish after evening stables, sometimes having the luxury of an hour and a half break at lunch time that is always supposing its not a day for racecourse duty.

So we make enough dough to put bread on the table and pay a mortgage, is that a big deal its hard earned money with little left to pay our taxes at the end.

We may even attempt to train a lad only thats like shovelling water up hill with the present administrative system, it seems to me that you are expect to pay heavily for that privilege, being treated as under valued scroungers, with little notice being taken of your employees needs or your employer wishes. Finally we are allowed a meeting, the reported outcome is completely frabricated, we are not even allowed a formal minute of the proceedings to rebut the nonsense report of proceedings, are you happy /easy with that ??

Guest, a serious suggestion, if you wish to go to war don't pick on your hard / long suffering peers, who like TARBABY are struggling in a potage of beaurocratic syrup, attack the BLOODY TOWER that is if any body is in who has the the courage to put their head above the parapet .

PNB.

Jenny Mac

Postby Jenny Mac » Sun Mar 27, 2005 8:44 am

Just how many of you discontents are horseowners?

john ford
Posts: 1052
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Location: Pucklechurch, Bristol.

Postby john ford » Mon Mar 28, 2005 7:25 am

How strange to see that the topic of this board started out with a simple question from a horseowner about road studs. Come on gentleman, give it a break, or take your arguments to another board.

PNB
Posts: 2238
Joined: Sun Jun 23, 2002 6:59 am
Location: Wilts, Berks, Ox, Hants, Avon.

Relative Boards.

Postby PNB » Mon Mar 28, 2005 6:17 pm

Jenny Mac / John Ford,

Does it really matter which board we use and for what?? as a board editor / press officer I am simply delighted that the facility is being used as much as it is.

By using the wrong section at the very least it has prompted you both to post again and for me to see the need to respond.

PNB.


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