Coronet Band Dystrophy

especially for horse owners to ask advice, from farriers or from other owners, all welcome, also please post details of lost or stolen horses here
Sian

Coronet Band Dystrophy

Postby Sian » Mon Jul 22, 2002 8:46 pm

Hi, Can anyone Help???
My 15.2 Welsh Cob Sidney, has just been diagnosed with coronet band dystrophy, and its causing both him and me a lot of grief.
Has anyone had any experiences with this condition? I would love some advice on how to manage it. I have been searching the Internet all night and cannot find one thing that refers to it. My vet says it quite rare and that not much is known about it so that why I am desperately seeking someone who can give me a little advice. I have tried many potions and lotions to try and improve the problem but have had little success. The condition is mainly located on his heels and causes itchy, crusty sores that often bleed.
Help!!!!
Thanks from Sian and Sidney X

admin
Site Admin
Posts: 679
Joined: Tue May 14, 2002 8:32 pm

Postby admin » Mon Jul 22, 2002 9:04 pm

Dear Sian,

I've never heard of this condition, though mud fever is common enough, sounds similar, and can be a real nightmare in rare cases. It sounds like a skin condition, is the hoof in any way abnormal? Are you in the UK? Any more details?

Best wishes,

Martin.

Guest

Postby Guest » Tue Jul 23, 2002 4:57 am

Hi Martin,
Thanks for replying so quickly. I have spent hours on the Internet trying to find some information on the condition.
The symptoms of 'Coronet Band Dystrophy' are much like those of mud fever, but the coronet band also has a rough flakey look to it. the bulbs of his heels become red and inflamed and quite often small infections occur. The area causes discomfort as I quite often see Sidney stamping his feet and trying to itch them on his water trough. 'Coronet Band Dystrophy' doesn't seem to affect his hooves as to date I have had no trouble with their growth and condition.
The Vet has performed two biopsys on different occasions and a skin scrape. We have changed his bedding to paper, treated him with numerous over the counter products, sprayed frontline on his legs to rule out any creepy crawlies, administered steroid cream and tablets, and a course of three injections to treat for mite infestation. My father even brought me back some 'Kopertox' solution from America. All treatments seem to work for a few weeks and then his condition worsens again.
At the moment Sidney is kept out at grass as much as possible and the condition is laying dormant so to speak. It can be seen if the crusty top layer is removed.
The condition is apparently quite rare and my vet has only ever diagnosed one other horse with it about 6 years ago.

Cheers From Sian

admin
Site Admin
Posts: 679
Joined: Tue May 14, 2002 8:32 pm

Postby admin » Tue Jul 23, 2002 5:04 am

Dear Sian,

It sounds as if you have tried everything I could have suggested, and that your vet has been very thorough. I would have called it mud fever though, I've never heard it called "coronet band dystrophy" so I'm not surprised you've not found any information under that title.

Has anyone else seen something similar? Can anyone suggest a solution?

Regards,

Martin.

PNBaker

Postby PNBaker » Tue Jul 23, 2002 4:54 pm

Sian,

Some time ago we had several N/H return from grass with the symptoms you describe, most got better when shod and stabled, however one did not for months this poor animal suffered great dried scabby areas from the coronet up to almost the hock, which would run yellow serum from under the scabby areas, the serum seemed to blister the surrounding skin when in came into contact with it. The condition seemed to be perpetuating itself. Zinc creams, Antibiotic spray, soap and water bandaging, picking the scabs off nothing seemed to work - the poor animal became more and more indignant the more one did.

It had quite a unexpected outcome though, the drainage in its stable wasn't good and it became a bit smelly as the warm spring came, so the lad sprinkled its bed with CARBOL DRY powder [carbolic acid powder], to make the stable smell better, amazingly within a week the areas that were scabbed over got smaller, soon all the scabs had dropped off, how ever the animal's back legs were now bald pinkish actually, it took several weeks for the hair to re establish, but it did.

I don't know if your animal has a mild dose of this what ever it was, this yard still uses Carbol Dry as a general disinfectant, [actually its another make now] it seems to keep most inflammatory lower leg and thrush related conditions at bay. You must however be advised by your Vet, before taking up any idea's.

PNB.

Guest

Coronary Band Dystrophy

Postby Guest » Sat Aug 10, 2002 9:53 pm

Hi Sian

According to the Manual of Equine Dermatology by Pascoe and Knottenbelt:

Coronary Band Dystrophy is an idiopathic (ie of unknown cause) defect in cornification of the coronary band which affects all four hooves simultaneously and equally. Mature horses of draught breeds seem most susceptible.

All four coronary bands show progressive proliferation and hyperkeratotic changes with extensive scaling and have a greasy feel. In severe cases there may be obvious changes in the hoof wall. Open lesions are often present with cracks and fissures which can bleed or ooze serum. The chestnut and ergot may be affected.

The condition is diagnosed on the signs and the elimination of other possibilities. The microscopic changes are non-specific and poorly defined.

Treatment is palliative only:
Removal of excessive horn and application of emollient creams.
Mild counterirritants applied to the coronet may help, but may make it worse.
Dietary supplementation with evening primrose oil, biotin and methionine may help
Corticosteroids have no material effect.

Hope that helps
Mark

Giles
Posts: 283
Joined: Wed May 15, 2002 4:41 am
Location: Wales
Contact:

Postby Giles » Sun Aug 11, 2002 5:32 am

This sounds like what used to be called greasy heels or leg in heavy draught horses, it only seemed to affect those with a lot of feather (hairy legs) and the treatment was to remove all hair and keep very clean. You could try a topical treatment with Clobetasone Butyrate (Eumovate(tm)) to stop the irritation.

Giles

admin
Site Admin
Posts: 679
Joined: Tue May 14, 2002 8:32 pm

Postby admin » Sun Aug 11, 2002 8:29 am

Sian,

I've checked a couple of old books on horse management and they seem to agree that the cause of greasy heels is generally due to excessive washing of the legs. They say to avoid washing the legs, if they are muddy then let the mud dry and brush it off, and if you absolutely have to wash the legs then dry them thoroughly straight after. This has been quite an interesting discussion with some very good contributions, has it helped at all?

Martin.

Sian Somerville

Coronet Band Dystrophy

Postby Sian Somerville » Thu Oct 30, 2003 3:51 pm

Re: Coronet Band Dystrophy 22/07/2002

Hi, I just want to say thanks for the advice given back in July 2002 on the subject of Coronet Band Dystrophy. I have only just come to read it. Sidneys condition has not improved although I have been undertaking a trial and error approach in trying to improve the condition.
I am very interested in the Carbol dry powder approach as if his stable become a little damp and smelly the condition becomes worse.
At the moment he is being treated with a coaltar/sudocream oitment which keeps it at bay.
Thanks again for the advice and I am certainly going to put some of the advice into practice.

Susan

Coronet Band Problems

Postby Susan » Thu Oct 30, 2003 3:52 pm

Sian,
Having read your post, it appears although you have had a lot of suggestions you have said the situation remains the same.

But to me I see this as another problem that Cytek shoeing would help with.

The reason I say that, is the shoes are a applied under the horse in a correct and balanced way. the toe is taken back to its correct breakover but more importantly the circulation is improved and that is all part of the process for a horse to function fully. PLus the whole body is allowed to function and move the way it should. More freedom.
It is very different to rim shoeing and cannot be compared.
I dont know what part of the country you are in,
I can only suggest you investigate this opprtunity for your horse. Presently your horse still has a problem. Cytek is not fitten by any farrier only a trained farrier registered with Cytek and trained by them to apply the shoes and be supplied by them.
Hense the reason to ask what part of the country you are in?

I can answer many questions or can suggest you visit the cytek forum
www.cytekhorse.com

Hope this helps.

john ford
Posts: 1052
Joined: Fri Oct 25, 2002 7:20 pm
Location: Pucklechurch, Bristol.

Postby john ford » Thu Oct 30, 2003 8:24 pm

I did wonder how long this discussion would go on until a crackpot started to join in. I suggest my dear you go away and take up potholing for an interest.

Susan

Postby Susan » Fri Oct 31, 2003 9:59 am

Dear Mr Ford,

I do think your attitude does you no favours. I was not rude and I do not feel that the tone of your reply is becoming of useful discussion.

No matter what you personally feel it is not right you stop another having an opportunbity of choice to investigate and decide for themselves.

The world is full of differing ideas and alternatives. The system at present is not helping Sian and her horse, I know that I have suggested an alternative she may or may not have known about.

I do not force her or anyone else to go that route, and you have no right to stop another having a chance to know about other routes.

Now tell what is worse to not know and risk losing your horse, or to know and at least make a desision based on that knowledge.

You are aware many horses have been helped with Cytek, whether you agree with its principles is nether here not there. None have had the right to play god and not pass all we can offer to assist another just because we dont like it.

I know you will come back with some tales to slate the Cytek System. That you have done on many previous occassions.
But still horses have been given a chance and are now sound because of it.

I could have not posted because of people of your attitude and it is off putting, knowing I am going to be flamed for posting.
All I can say is I cant sit here and not let another know and live with myself.
Perhaps you need to just reflect your attitude and how you speak to others.

But Cytek speaks for itself when it is applied correct and the horse given time and support it needs.

You must fear it to be so nasty at every opportunity.

john ford
Posts: 1052
Joined: Fri Oct 25, 2002 7:20 pm
Location: Pucklechurch, Bristol.

.

Postby john ford » Fri Oct 31, 2003 7:59 pm

Susan, you have missed a vital point to this discussion when you mentioned shoeing with Cytek or Egg Bars, Fitzygram, or any other shoe or system that springs to mind. If you care to read all the letters on this topic, you will find that it is a skin complaint above the hoof capsule. And no type of shoeing is going to make any difference to the cause or healing process. That is why I was so rude in my reply, as some people think that Cytek shoeing can cure anything and everything. Statements such as yours can, and do, alot of damage to a product Every shoe or shoeing system has it's place in farriery, which all farriers will agree. But when a system such as Cytek is pushed in the manner that it can cure fluid on the knee, mud fever, and any other ailment to do with the equine, then I am afraid you will get person's such as myself, having a laugh and joke at your's and Cytek's exspence

looseshoe

Postby looseshoe » Sat Nov 01, 2003 2:38 pm

john,
You are exactly right. The problem these people have is that they have "Magical thinking" This will cure freckles warts, cancer, make childbirth a pleasure and man you should see the curly fries! These aree the same people that try and use aroma therapy for a severed artery ! Logic is lost.This IS a skin disorder and there is no reason to believe that changing the shoeing will affect the skin. I was exposed to Cytek while in the U.K. recently. It is Barbaric (I am being generous!) and the horse was still lame (although after a large bill the lady THOUGHT the horse was sound.............It is Insanity.

Cheers,
CAM

Susan

Postby Susan » Sat Nov 01, 2003 4:26 pm

Dear Mr Ford,
I mentioned Cytek because the system allows improved circulation.
That alone as you know inproves not only healing it allows better restistance to infection.
Now it appears from all the posts, that all that anyone can think of has been tried and failed.
We know if this is Mud Fever it comes from the soil, and some horses are more prone then others.
But the most helpful thing is the body itself to help deal from within.Rather then a plaster on a dirty cut approach.

I am not sure wha you feel with regard to alternative remedys, but to only apply on the outside and the problem is in the skin and the body allows it to simmer away, you may do better to consider another approach.
Please do not assume because I mention Cytek I am a crackpot.

I can only offer another idea on how to handle this problem.

john ford
Posts: 1052
Joined: Fri Oct 25, 2002 7:20 pm
Location: Pucklechurch, Bristol.

Postby john ford » Sat Nov 01, 2003 8:01 pm

Susan, thank you for your wisdom, but in order to fix anything, one must fully understand why such an injury developed, Farriery is no different. Unless we fully understand why something occured, we will never fix it. Trial and error are the worst forms of treatment for anything, partically in farriery. Laminitis is one of the best examples to explain my drift. If one does not find out the reason WHY the horse or pony got laminitis, then it will most certainly get it again. I have no answer to the author of this discussion, but if no one comes up with a constructive theory on the reason WHY ? it can never be fixed for good.

Guest

Postby Guest » Fri Nov 07, 2003 2:37 pm

Well that killed that discussion.

Susan

Postby Susan » Fri Nov 07, 2003 3:18 pm

Sorry not killed just I was ill and away

So far many of the ideas have been trial and error.

Yes to find the cause is what curing is about but who knows with Mud Fever or an issue such as this. Many things have been tried.

It was only a suggestion and still I get slated, why if you feel so anti just ignore my posts.

Perhaps taking the shoes off altogether might also be a useful thing to do as again the circulation will improve. It might even be the lack of circulation was the reason this horse has the issue so it might be the cause.

Guest

Postby Guest » Wed Oct 20, 2004 6:24 pm

Sian,
I dont doubt your vet's diagnosis but if your horse has sore itchy heels and is stamping a lot he may well also have heel mites. The best way to check this is to scratch firmly with your fingers the skin under the feathers just at the back of the leg where it meets the foot, right inside the fold under the ergot, on a front foot - DO NOT DO THIS WITH A HIND FOOT - a good indication he may have mites he will thoroughly enjoy it!! If he does, your vet will be able to confirm this by taking a scraping and looking for the mites under a microscope. You cannot see them yourself as they are too small and live under the top surface layer of the skin, where they eat the under layer, which is why they itch so much, can cause sores and make the horse more susceptible to mud fever.

To deal with mites, many vets recommend spraying the legs and especially the heels with Frontline, or equivalent, spray. Make sure it penetrates onto the affected skin - you may have to remove his feathers to do this. It will be necessary to repeat this from time to time especially if your horse is out in the field with others - they pass from horse to horse, although in general horses with finer coats suffer less because there is not enough insulation of the skin for mites to survive in large numbers.

In any case, you should consult your vet first.

As a farrier, I find it unlikely that this is a shoeing problem, although very deep thrush can cause distress and make a horse stamp, it would not cause the lesions you describe.

If he has heel mites, once they are gone, you will be able to see much more clearly if he has any other problems.

Izzy

Postby Izzy » Sat Nov 27, 2004 6:26 pm

My horse was unable to get in foal so I tried CYTEK shoeing and within one month of shoeing she was in foal. I believe that the circulation pointed out by Susan, who is my guru, eventually cleaned out my mares tubes and allowed her to concieve. CYTEK CAN CURE ALL PROBLEMS.

pop
Posts: 12
Joined: Sun Jun 09, 2002 6:04 pm
Location: Durham

Postby pop » Sun Nov 28, 2004 12:58 pm

I will inform my daughter who has wasted thousands on ivf treatment that all she need do is change her shoes.??????????.

Guest

Postby Guest » Sun Nov 28, 2004 4:17 pm

Pop, Look what it did for the population of China?

Thats like cytek, another example of what happens with seriously constricted female feet.

Guest

Postby Guest » Sun Nov 28, 2004 4:49 pm

mmmm

intouch

copper deficiency

Postby intouch » Thu Dec 01, 2005 11:00 pm

Had a pony with this problem - neither vet nor farrier knew what it was, applied copper sulphate crystals a couple of times and gave her a copper supplement - very little did it. she was also better without shoes but I'll not push that on here!

Guest

Postby Guest » Mon Dec 05, 2005 9:50 pm

:drinking:

henrietta
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 5:51 pm

Postby henrietta » Tue Feb 09, 2010 1:34 am

Oh lord, here we go. Coronet Band Dystrophy (CBD) is NOT greasy heels, mud rash/fever, a shoeing problem, mites or any of the silly nonsense mentioned on here. It is a serious auto-immune condition in which the body is effectively rejecting the feet. It is incurable but is not in itself terminal but the effects of it may lead to euthanasia.

In addition to the feet the chestnuts and ergots may flake and bleed, the coat may be affected and in really unfortunate cases the liver may be seriously damaged. In my elderly mare her coat becomes scurvy and staring when she is suffering a flare up but fortunately blood tests have shown no liver damage.

It is unclear whether it is a rare condition or whether it is not widely known so it is not diagnosed correctly. Prior to her retirement when I bought her, she had been treated for many years for incurable thrush by her previous vet. My vet had never heard of it and her boss, a very respected vet in the north west of England, had heard of it but never seen a case. It was diagnosed with the help of a very experienced horse-woman friend who suggested CBD to the vet.

It is common for treatments to be successful for a few weeks and just as you think you are getting somewhere the treatment ceases to have any effect. We had reached this stage with my horse when co-incidentally my vet met Professor Knottenbolt of Liverpool University who is running a study into CBD. She showed him pohotographs of the Old Girl's feet and described her condition and he confirmed that it was a classic preentation.

We were given some of the medication which Liverpool are trialing but in the way of these things, despite a brief improvement, it didn't work in the long term (ie 3 weeks!). Shortly afterwards the Old Girl had gone so severely down hill and was so ill and in great pain and we had arrived at the hard decision. However, our vet persuaded us to give her a last chance with steroids, on the principle that they couldn't make things worse and might help - at least giving her a few months more of good quality life.

This was six months ago and the old girl hasn't looked back. We are aware that steroids cannot be a long term answer as they cause damage themselves but the Old Girl is healthy and happy and enjoying life as a field ornament and companion to a friend's nervy gelding.

I know that it's a long time since the original post in this thread but I hope the poster is still watching. If so it might be worth consulting your vet about the possibility of steroids. They don't always work and they are expensive* but definitely worth discussing. It may also be a good idea to have a joint consultation with a good remedial farrier and your vet to decide on the best way to proceed with hoof trimming and shoeing.

* the medication costs around £200 for 30 days supply!

All the best and let us know how you are getting on.

jaimep
Posts: 121
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 5:20 pm
Location: 50 miles of Chesterfield, mid Wales, Cornwall, jaimeexup@hotmail.com

Postby jaimep » Mon Feb 15, 2010 12:18 am

Thank you Henrietta. I've found your posts on this and other threads very interesting.

Did Derek make any comment on the success of the steroids?

Cytek!? What the?! Crackpot is right John! Good to be in agreement with you for a change!

henrietta
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 5:51 pm

Postby henrietta » Mon Feb 15, 2010 10:26 am

jaimep wrote:Thank you Henrietta. I've found your posts on this and other threads very interesting.

Did Derek make any comment on the success of the steroids?

Cytek!? What the?! Crackpot is right John! Good to be in agreement with you for a change!


Hi, Jaimep. No, nothing from Derek. Yours is the only reply. The vet will be checking on the Old Girl's progress when we need the next prescription and will probably do a blood test but up to date the steroids have been a great success. Incidentally, I forgot to mention that I have read that it's suggested that naturally occurring selenium poisoning may be implicated in CBD but that may be more of a problem abroad than in the UK as there are few areas here with sufficiently high selenium deposits in the land and therefore the grass. According to the article American sufferers may need to take it into consideration

I have to say that Cytek sounds particularly lunatic. It's frightening what people seem to be allowed to get away with. A couple of years ago the ILPH/World Horse Welfare's bulletin carried a report of a successful prosecution for cruelty against a Strasser practitioner. But these people have to be caught first.

jaimep
Posts: 121
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 5:20 pm
Location: 50 miles of Chesterfield, mid Wales, Cornwall, jaimeexup@hotmail.com

Postby jaimep » Wed Feb 17, 2010 2:57 pm

I believe three Strasser practitioners have been successfully prosecuted to date.

Whilst I could never endorse the Strasser technique as it is fundamentally flawed and can result in approaches to trimming that can be frankly barbaric, it should be noted that none of the practitioners were prosecuted for the actual work they did on the horse's feet (as many believe). Rather it was the conditions and circumstance that they were kept in which resulted in the prosecutions.

I know of one particular case in some detail and it certainly was not as straight forward as some media reports would have you believe. Indeed under the 2006 Animal Welfare Act it is probably that that particular prosecution would never have come about as the onus of responsibility would now be more on the owner themselves who instigated the prosecution in the first place.

Debonair351
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 16, 2010 2:13 am

Postby Debonair351 » Fri Apr 16, 2010 12:00 pm

Hi Sian,
My horse seems to have just what you discribe... i was wondering what your outcome was?? and if u have any pics...
i was hoping to PM you but cant see how to... ( can anyone tell me how to contact Sian??)
or has anyone else seen anything like this?
vet has given him 2 courses of penicilin... i am now just covering with sudocream ( nappy rash cream )
Image
Image
plus his chestnuts are flaking and bleeding underneath...
we are booked in with dermatology section of murdoch vet hopsital in couple weeks, but obviosly if i can get ideas of what is is and treatment before then it will save me a small fortune!
thanks guys
Bec

csc
Posts: 950
Joined: Fri May 20, 2005 5:40 am
Location: berks

Postby csc » Sat Apr 17, 2010 7:14 am

hi deb what conditions are you keeping your horse in is he in a field if so is he near any water or is he permanently stabled

henrietta
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 5:51 pm

Postby henrietta » Sat Apr 17, 2010 11:23 am

Debonair351 wrote:Hi Sian,
My horse seems to have just what you discribe... i was wondering what your outcome was?? and if u have any pics...
i was hoping to PM you but cant see how to... ( can anyone tell me how to contact Sian??)
or has anyone else seen anything like this?
vet has given him 2 courses of penicilin... i am now just covering with sudocream ( nappy rash cream )

plus his chestnuts are flaking and bleeding underneath...
we are booked in with dermatology section of murdoch vet hopsital in couple weeks, but obviosly if i can get ideas of what is is and treatment before then it will save me a small fortune!
thanks guys
Bec

Hi Bec. I am not a vet, obviously, but your horse's symptoms are the same as my Old Girl's (see my post above) and I wonder if your vet has suggested Coronet Band Dystrophy? Your vet should be able to find info about this on the internet if he hasn't come across the problem before (don't worry, a lot of vet's haven't and it was my loan lady who picked up on it)

Despite what it says on various internet sites, we have had considerable success with Prednidale (the UK name for the equine version of Prednisalone) which is a steroid. It was expensive to start with (over £200 a month - gulp!) but after 6 months the vet has been able to lower the dose to about half. Before steroids we had got to the stage where we were seriously considering putting the Old Girl to sleep on welfare grounds but she is now in blooming condition. She recently had her 6 month assessment to see if the steroids were causing any side-effects and they weren't.

We have retired the Old Girl but not because of the CBD. She's 23 and has worked hard all her life and deserves her retirement. She now has a full--time job as a companion horse and field ornament.

Best wishes to you and your horse and I hope this is sorted out happily

Debonair351
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 16, 2010 2:13 am

Postby Debonair351 » Sat Apr 17, 2010 1:35 pm

csc wrote:hi deb what conditions are you keeping your horse in is he in a field if so is he near any water or is he permanently stabled


hi there, he is in a paddock ( i am in western australia ) which is clayish, there was a wet area around the water trough where the water overflowed and it was quite muddy and smelly. he spent alot of time standing in it... mayb because it was cool and soothed his feet ( he has contracted heels and has been bordering laminitis for years. ) other than that is is quite dry. He seems to have what looked like greasy heel for a bit..
i noticed the bleeding coronet one day a few months ago when i got back from riding out in the Old Mac boots, i asumed it was just rubbing from the boot and just didnt ride in boots again... the greasy heel i asumed was separate and i tried spraying with coloidal silver and apple cider vinegar as thought this may clear it up... so i guess it was almost 2 months later and i noticed that the coronets actually had blood trickling down i paniced and took him to the vet...
that was a month ago... i must say they are looking improved since using the sudocream.. but i want to make sure its not systemic or that it will cause further issues with his feet... hence the booking to murdoch.
but i want to go armed with as much info as possible cause if i can save them the trouble of some tests it will be good.
Henrietta, thanks heaps, i hate the idea of steroids, but if that will help i will concider. my vet i 1st took him to 1st said it was a staph infection and penicilin would fix it... then after 2nd course of it they said stop scrubbing with betadine and not to stress about it...
i just want my boy better! he is only 12 yrs old.

csc
Posts: 950
Joined: Fri May 20, 2005 5:40 am
Location: berks

Postby csc » Sun Apr 18, 2010 6:41 am

sounds to me the old mac boots caused it and the problem stems from there do you think that is correct

csc
Posts: 950
Joined: Fri May 20, 2005 5:40 am
Location: berks

Postby csc » Sun Apr 18, 2010 6:48 am

i am trying to take this step by step to get the facts as it sounds that you have already made your own diagnosis

Debonair351
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 16, 2010 2:13 am

Postby Debonair351 » Sun Apr 18, 2010 7:33 am

yes, it did occur to me.. mayb that rubbing the skin raw and then him standing in mud has created it... ?? but i only put front boots on him and the sores are on all 4.. and the chestnuts...

csc
Posts: 950
Joined: Fri May 20, 2005 5:40 am
Location: berks

Postby csc » Mon Apr 19, 2010 5:34 am

are there any poisonous plants or stinging plants in the paddock

jaimep
Posts: 121
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 5:20 pm
Location: 50 miles of Chesterfield, mid Wales, Cornwall, jaimeexup@hotmail.com

Postby jaimep » Wed Apr 21, 2010 10:51 am

From the description I doubt that the Old Macs caused this. That said they can rub particularly the originals. The solution is to put a pair of socks (football socks?) on under the boots. Choose your favourite colour!

Interesting and worthwhile conversation this, keep it up.

Debonair351
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 16, 2010 2:13 am

Postby Debonair351 » Wed Apr 28, 2010 4:43 am

My vet seems to think its a severe case of greasy heel... he has had my horse since last tue ( am not lookin forward to the bill! ) and he is determined to fix it before i get him back :)
fingers xd! will keep you posted.

macfee
Posts: 39
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2008 6:59 am
Location: Peaslake Surrey

Postby macfee » Wed Apr 28, 2010 8:19 pm

What i read is your horse has Mud fever plain and simple, you could have treated that youself, BASIC STABLE MANEGMENT get your horse out of the wet instead of standing in waterlogged fields or dung filled Kralls or stables..... your Vet will make a mint from you hope you have understanding Bank Manager....... please tell us what you Owe 8O :lol: ,

Debonair351
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 16, 2010 2:13 am

Postby Debonair351 » Wed Apr 28, 2010 11:55 pm

macfee wrote:What i read is your horse has Mud fever plain and simple, you could have treated that youself, BASIC STABLE MANEGMENT get your horse out of the wet instead of standing in waterlogged fields or dung filled Kralls or stables..... your Vet will make a mint from you hope you have understanding Bank Manager....... please tell us what you Owe 8O :lol: ,


actually... i have a bare dry paddock, it is just leaving summer here in australia! there was a patch where the water over flowed as i had been told by a few trimmers to soak his feet daily to help with decontraction... he must have been feeling relief in the wet cause it was that muddy patch he stands in ALL the time! from the 1st trip to the vets and the antibiotics to this trip ( 4 weeks later ) i had stopped leaving the hose in the trough, i was treating it DAILY with ( prednederm or sudocream or homeopathic ) however we had a day of rain - the low point near trough got wet again and the sod stands in it ( grrr) my vet was quite harsh with me and said this shouldnt have been so hard to clear up u must be doing something wrong, bring him here and i'll fix it in a few days....,
after a week of being locked in a stable and dry and bandaged with prednaderm he still wasnt happy with it... so i think i did everthing in my power to treat it myself and do best by my my horse... it just didnt work... i got a bobcat in and filled all the area closest to the feedshed ( where water trough and feeding is ) with soil so it is a nice high point and should stay dry for when he comes back...
sorry, just offended at being told twice that it cant have been that hard to fix myself when i did everything ithought possble

csc
Posts: 950
Joined: Fri May 20, 2005 5:40 am
Location: berks

Postby csc » Thu Apr 29, 2010 5:27 am

debs it seems to me you are drip feeding the facts and have not been to honest about this i believe you are quite happy with the drama of your horse i feel for your vet they obviously see the need to remove the horse from you

Debonair351
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 16, 2010 2:13 am

Postby Debonair351 » Thu Apr 29, 2010 10:38 am

csc - sorry, but when my vet ( after the 2 courses of penicilin ) told me to take him home and not worry bout them theyd b fine i googled bleeding coronets and along my search found this thread...
as my vet had only said its a staph infection and the antibiotics hadnt worked i went searching for more ideas to help get it better....
i was hoping to hear back from the OP as to the end result with her horse...
i thought i had posted most of my story ( sorry bout the repeat of info ) realised i had already put info on the paddock conditions in answer to ur questions... i believe i have given you all my info with pics included and have been honest from the start...
my vet has found it wasnt as easy to fix as he 1st thought either... he did not " remove my horse from me" he just keeps telling me its not better to his liking and wants to keep him there, it wasnt till the weekend he finally told me he thinks it is a type of greasy heel... before that no one seemed to be able to give me answers, all in all a frustrating couple of months for me where i've had to watch my beautiful boy not right. i would be much happier to be out chasin cows on him than dealing with this drama...
hes a pic of my boy - does he look like he is suffering in my care?
Image

csc
Posts: 950
Joined: Fri May 20, 2005 5:40 am
Location: berks

Postby csc » Thu Apr 29, 2010 1:50 pm

not at all .glad to hear everything is now ok and remember you pay a qualified professional big bucks so listen to there advise as they are always in the best position to sort it out .
wonder cures don't exist only cost

Debonair351
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 16, 2010 2:13 am

Postby Debonair351 » Wed Jun 16, 2010 2:32 pm

I just thought i'd post my outcome at this point in time with Chip...
I moved chip to new place just over a month ago, he was stabled 24/7 for about 4 days and they were nice and dry. back out in new paddock and they erupted and bled again, they would heal then bleed then heal then bleed... vet gave him an injection to stop the irritation, but after a month at new place and stabled when it rained to keep dry they still werent 100% better. I went to a vet friend of a friend who was keen to do bloods and biospies (finally!) all been done and he has a bacterial infection "DIAGNOSIS. Superficial pustular dermatitis with pyoderma."
cultures were done and we have hit it with the right antibiotics which hes been on for a week now. It all seems to be clearing up, the chestnuts peeled of and underneath are nice and pale pink n not blood spotted as they were. fingers crossed uphill from here, only doubt now is if its a secondary infection caused by an allergy... will know that if the symptoms come back after he comes off the meds...
i know in my searches i never found any resolves for these issues... so hoping this will help someone if they come across it!
Push for bloods and biopsies - without its just guesswork, stress and money! and suffering for all!
cheers for reading :o

jaimep
Posts: 121
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 5:20 pm
Location: 50 miles of Chesterfield, mid Wales, Cornwall, jaimeexup@hotmail.com

Postby jaimep » Wed Jul 07, 2010 9:46 am

Thanks for the update Debs. Interesting.


Return to “horseowners discussion board”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 1 guest