Training horses for the farrier

especially for horse owners to ask advice, from farriers or from other owners, all welcome, also please post details of lost or stolen horses here
Dawn Tibble
Posts: 29
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2005 12:50 pm
Location: Berkshire
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Training horses for the farrier

Postby Dawn Tibble » Tue Jan 03, 2006 1:51 pm

There are times when owners and farriers all fall short to horses and ponies misbehaving whilst being shod.

In my way of thinking, and I am sure you all agree, the horses should feel comfortable and relaxed around the farrier. The farrier needs to build a rapport with the horses to gain trust. But foremost, it is in the hands of the owner to ensure that there is good behaviour.

It is of benefit to share stories and training tips, both good and bad, to learn new things and make the experience easier.

So if anyone has success or not so successfull stories to share I will be interested in hearing about them.

regards
Dawn

Dawn Tibble
Posts: 29
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2005 12:50 pm
Location: Berkshire
Contact:

Postby Dawn Tibble » Wed Jan 04, 2006 5:55 pm

Based on true stories.

First Dilemma:

A farrier has been called to shoe a new pony, bought through a private sale for a child of twelve, the child just out of riding school. Mum thinks she is a talented rider, the riding school instructor told her so, but mum has no experience of horses or riding. They have decided to keep the pony on DIY, to save money. The pony is cheeky, argumentative and bolshy. The pony refuses to stand for shoeing and the child is too small to control it. the pony is is dire need of rebalancing and shoeing.


Second dilemma:
Ex racehorse was given to the owners wife for a happy hack. He was retired after 12 years flat racing due to sacroliac joint injury. The horse is still very fit, bucks regularly, and has a tendency to go into race mode on the common, but owner wants to reabilitate for flatwork and hacks and fun rides anyway. The hoofs are very flat, low heeled and softed soled. He was shod with rimmed shoe. The shoes came off regularly due to the condition of the feet, over reaching (at times) but clumsyness due to overexcitment.


These are just but two of the hundreds of problems seen and experienced by farriers and trainers.

Both cases ended up with positive results.

first dilemma:
the owner and her mum were both talked to by the farrier, who gave excellent advice for them to progress in their horse ownership. First he adviced to get a trainer, this is where I came in.

My opinions on this is : I have seen many new owners getting their first horse/pony, normally privately owned, without experienced help, where the new owner has been dupped into buying a quiet pony, when it is not. In this case: The mum and child were under the impression that all ponies would act the same way as a riding school pony. First mistake.
The mother, acting on the advice of the riding school instructor in that the child was a good rider, thought it was time the child owned her own. Second mistake.
The farrier, even though refused to shoe the pony did the best for the pony at the time, much to the moans and groans of the owner and others on the yard, in that the farrier should have known what to do. Third mistake.

Well he does know what he is doing, but when having to deal with all the other variables was correct in what he did. He was a bit dismayed in that he still got the flack and blame. It must be remembered that farriers have to deal with a lot of misbehaving horses, but to what cost, if he gets an injury that means no money.

Second dilemma:
The farrier adviced that this TB would be better off being turned out for the winter to rough off, the shoes were removed and kept trimmed and the owner was adviced to use products and suppllements to help. The owner was pleased to do this.

There was a lot of speculation on the caused of the bad feet and bucking, the majority of people suggested it was the rimmed shoes.

I found though that,
1: the saddle was far to narrow and heavy, this racehorse was used to racing saddle not a leather GP.
2:The fitness of the horse made him far too hotblooded for the amount of reabilitation the owners was giving.
And, most importantly,
3:all the nutrition was utilised to give the horse the energy for racing, which, If feel was detrimental to the hoof .
The body will utilise any nutrients in areas that are being worked most. So when you perceive that TBs have bad feet, and sometimes it is a DNA factor, I feel that it is mainly due to the nutritional utilisation, performance indicators and riding/training ability. NOt the shoes.

His feet now have improved, he has front rimmed and barefoot hind. He is now in the postion, behaviourly to go forth in his training, which has proved successfull so far.


What are your thoughts on these.

regards
Dawn

PNB
Posts: 2238
Joined: Sun Jun 23, 2002 6:59 am
Location: Wilts, Berks, Ox, Hants, Avon.

Postby PNB » Fri Jan 06, 2006 3:29 pm

Dawn,

There is a key to every door, it is being Sharp enough to see what you are looking at, then know what can be done about it.

Keep up the good work.

PNB.

Guest

Postby Guest » Sat Jan 07, 2006 8:08 pm

Thanks PNB.

There is a key, but this comes with the experience, in some cases, to recognise what door it will fit. By talking about senarios and peoples experience each door is more reachable. I think.

It seems that in each dilemma there is always an answer. The key is to look at what gets you to the door in the first place, not just to look at the door when it is facing you. It is the realisation of the journey to the door that will set you free. Some journeys are repetitive others are unique, this is how we all learn and prosper.

Horsemanship comes with looking at the whole picture not just part of it.

regards
Dawn

Dawn Tibble
Posts: 29
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2005 12:50 pm
Location: Berkshire
Contact:

Postby Dawn Tibble » Sat Jan 07, 2006 8:14 pm

Just found my log in details. that last post was by me, did not want it to appear annonymous.

regards
Dawn

Guest

Postby Guest » Wed Jan 18, 2006 9:24 pm

Horsemanship is skill you are born with, you cant teach it the answer lies with the wrong sort of people owning horses in the very first place.
Bums on seats nvq thick kids, even thicker teachers teaching them, college today is about taking anyone for funding never-mind his/her exam results from school on a first come basis.
We see it within farriery students, yes they can make shoes but are shit scared of the horse, what use are they.


TOP FARRIER

Guest

Postby Guest » Thu Jan 19, 2006 6:19 pm

You are right in what you say of course, but for those that are not born with this skill, they still need to learn for the sake of the horse and those who have to deal with it, ie farriers, vets, saddlers ect ect. Because there is always going to be wrong type of horse owner. (the pony club breeds most of them, sorry thats one of my pet hates)

without being able to go out there and show them face to face, what else is there to do but to share dilemmas and scenarios, in the hope that someone may get the point and learn from it.

Being taught in colleges ect is another arguement altogether, and many horses owners are self taught but still as green as the grass when it comes to understanding the horse and the problems that can arise.
Some instructors are also dire even though they may have scrapped through the BHS system.

How many farriers do you know that cringe at the way an owner treats their horse or have no clue in how to train it, but still expect the farrier to deal with darling horsey.

regards
Dawn


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