White line separation

especially for horse owners to ask advice, from farriers or from other owners, all welcome, also please post details of lost or stolen horses here
BevGeegee
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2002 6:19 pm
Location: Nottingham/Derby

White line separation

Postby BevGeegee » Thu Jun 01, 2006 12:07 pm

Can someone advise please ??? Bit of a long one I'm afraid......

My 22 year old horse had a mild laminitis bout last Spring due to Cushings disease complications. It showed bruising in all four feet over a period of about three months which eventually grew out one by one.

Six weeks ago my blacksmith found an abscess in his left forefoot which he partly pared away, applying some hoof putty. Last week when he took the shoe off, about 3 inches of white line separation has appeared on the outside of the foot. He was shod again but when I put him back out in the field, there was muddy water squirting out one of the nailholes about an inch up his foot when he put weight on it.

Can someone please advise if this is likely to cause futher infection in that foot and if it is normal for white line separation to develop after an abscess ?? Is there anything I can do to help maintain a healthy hoof ??? Will it grow out ??? I have the added complication that he has severe DJD and gets extremely sore if he is in for more than overnight - he's on 2 or 3 bute a day and has been for 4 years (his liver function is the top end of normal !!).

The other thing I have noticed is that the top 1/2 inch of hoof wall around the coronet band on that foot appears to be indented/constricted all the way around. I've been strip grazing him and haven't noticed any laminitic signs - digital pulse, stance, increased lameness (not really paranoid) so was wondering if this may be just down to restricted grazing ?? If there is sinking of the pedal bone, does the depression described appear all the way around the hoof ??? Does it appear on the fleshy part of the coronet band or on the hoof wall ?? Want to keep him as happy and comfortable as possible and try to counter any further potential problems.

john ford
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Joined: Fri Oct 25, 2002 7:20 pm
Location: Pucklechurch, Bristol.

Postby john ford » Sun Jun 04, 2006 8:46 pm

Dear Bev, just a very quick answer as I’m off to bed. The laminitis is a result of the Cushions disease, and not the other way around. Also because of the Cushions there is a breakdown of the immune system. Your farrier and veterinary surgeon are fighting a loosing battle with nature in the advanced stages of Cushions disease. We all hope one day there will be a cure for this, but I haven’t heard of anything yet. I'm very sorry to say this, but it is time to call the end of your horse's day's, to end anymore suffering.

admin
Site Admin
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Joined: Tue May 14, 2002 8:32 pm

Postby admin » Sun Jun 04, 2006 9:20 pm

That is the worst case scenario, but there are degrees of severity, and things may not be that bad.

To answer your questions:

The abscess: Can someone please advise if this is likely to cause futher infection in that foot and if it is normal for white line separation to develop after an abscess ?? No and yes.

Is there anything I can do to help maintain a healthy hoof ??? Occasional abscesses are impossible to avoid. Will it grow out ??? Yes.

The other thing I have noticed is that the top 1/2 inch of hoof wall around the coronet band on that foot appears to be indented/constricted all the way around. I've been strip grazing him and haven't noticed any laminitic signs - digital pulse, stance, increased lameness (not really paranoid) so was wondering if this may be just down to restricted grazing ??

It may be, but often chronic laminitis can go on without signs of lameness.

If there is sinking of the pedal bone, does the depression described appear all the way around the hoof ??? Yes but usually more at the toe. Does it appear on the fleshy part of the coronet band or on the hoof wall ?? Usually just on the hoof wall.

Want to keep him as happy and comfortable as possible and try to counter any further potential problems.

It is hard to give specific advice about your horse without knowing more. But I would hope that you can keep him comfortable with support from your vet and your farrier and by getting to know how best to manage your horses laminitis given his particular personality and characteristics and the environment in which he is kept.

BevGeegee
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2002 6:19 pm
Location: Nottingham/Derby

Thanks.....

Postby BevGeegee » Mon Jun 05, 2006 7:16 am

For the replies - it gives me a bit more confidence that the white line separation will grow out now. He's not overweight, his coat and eyes are bright and he thought it really funny the other day to push my friends daughter on her bum in a bucket of water - always had a sense of humour !!!!

At the minute, Indy seems content, trots and canters quite happily, albeit a bit lame !!!! He's eating his grub as enthusiastically as ever, loves grooming and being with my other horse and can't wait for visits from people to give him a fuss....

I know that this disease and it's related problems are progressive and he was diagnosed at 17 as having Cushings, so he's living on borrowed time. I'm sure from knowing him inside out for the last 14 years that I'll know when the time comes with him. I'm sure it's not yet for a little while longer.........when that light in his eyes goes out - that'll be the time.

Thanks again for the replies and if anyone else can offer advice, I'd be more than grateful !!!

cowboy_bc
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2005 4:33 pm
Location: canada

Postby cowboy_bc » Tue Jun 06, 2006 12:02 am


Giles
Posts: 283
Joined: Wed May 15, 2002 4:41 am
Location: Wales
Contact:

Saleman

Postby Giles » Tue Jun 06, 2006 5:24 am

Cowboy,
She got the good advice, from both a Farrier and a Vet. Why are you drumming up some busines, think you can do better ?

PNB
Posts: 2239
Joined: Sun Jun 23, 2002 6:59 am
Location: Wilts, Berks, Ox, Hants, Avon.

Postby PNB » Tue Jun 06, 2006 10:56 am

Cowboy,

I tend to agree with Giles, as suggested I logged on to you site today, which seems to have emphasis on drawing as much money as possible for doing a bog standard day to day job. I do not approve of fleecing clients who are at their most vulnerable with a sick / distressed animal!!

We earn enough from shoeing on a daily basis, if the system of service application and routine advice breaks down leaving a distressed animal it must be our duty to offer support on little more than a costs only basis, it cannot be seen as a massive revenue earner, that is surely is the remit of the Vets!!

PNB.

sun tzu

sdfgsdg

Postby sun tzu » Sat Jun 10, 2006 10:39 pm

sdgsgsdg

jaimep
Posts: 121
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 5:20 pm
Location: 50 miles of Chesterfield, mid Wales, Cornwall, jaimeexup@hotmail.com

Postby jaimep » Wed Mar 07, 2007 5:18 pm

Q. Can someone please advise if this is likely to cause further infection in that foot
A. Yes, because clearly the hoof is exposed to potential fungal, bacterial, and viral infections.

Q. and if it is normal for white line separation to develop after an abscess ??
A. not necessarily.

Q. Is there anything I can do to help maintain a healthy hoof ???
A. yes, but on this board I’d probably get lynched : )

Will it grow out ???
A. Yes with time and the right conditions and stimulus.

Q. The other thing I have noticed is that the top 1/2 inch of hoof wall around the coronet band on that foot appears to be indented/constricted all the way around.
A. That’s as a result of the founder.

Q. I've been strip grazing him and haven't noticed any laminitic signs - digital pulse, stance, increased lameness (not really paranoid) so was wondering if this may be just down to restricted grazing ??
A. No, its due to movement (either rotation or in extreme cases sinking) of the pedal bone.

Q. If there is sinking of the pedal bone, does the depression described appear all the way around the hoof ???
A. In a sinker yes. With founder it tends to be more at the front (logical if you think about it).

Q. Does it appear on the fleshy part of the coronet band or on the hoof wall ??
A. There is no ‘fleshy part of the coronary band’. It cannot appear in the hoof wall. The depression appears above the coronary band. You can feel it better than see it by running your hand down the pastern towards the hoof if it gets stuck you have some level of founder.

Hope that helps.


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